OSX

To remap the zoom, favorites, shortcut buttons, etc. on a Microsoft Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000, when using Apple OSX, the USB Overdrive utility works very well. Just open the preferences pane, and hit the special key you want to modify. It appears in the list, and you can remap it to anything. For a more complex solution, which is powerful but harder to pick up, try [ControllerMate][http://www.orderedbytes.com/controllermate/].
My current bash prompt looks like this (nice and simple): It's created using the following value for PS1 in bash profile: PS1="\[$txtgrn\]\h::\u [\[$txtpur\]\W\[$txtgrn\]]\$ \[$txtrst\]" I've configured the various different servers I use to be different colours, and all of them to be red when running as root. Follow the guide on ArchWiki. txtblk='\e[0;30m' # Black - Regular txtred='\e[0;31m' # Red txtgrn='\e[0;32m' # Green txtylw='\e[0;33m' # Yellow txtblu='\e[0;34m' # Blue txtpur='\e[0;35m' # Purple txtcyn='\e[0;36m' # Cyan txtwht='\e[0;37m' # White bldblk='\e[1;30m' # Black - Bold bldred='\e[1;31m' # Red bldgrn='\e[1;32m' # Green bldylw='\e[1;33m' # Yellow bldblu='\e[1;34m' # Blue bldpur='\e[1;35m' # Purple bldcyn='\e[1;36m' # Cyan bldwht='\e[1;37m' # White unkblk='\e[4;30m' # Black - Underline undred='\e[4;31m' # Red undgrn='\e[4;32m' # Green undylw='\e[4;33m' # Yellow undblu='\e[4;34m' # Blue undpur='\e[4;35m' # Purple undcyn='\e[4;36m' # Cyan undwht='\e[4;37m' # White bakblk='\e[40m' # Black - Background bakred='\e[41m' # Red badgrn='\e[42m' # Green bakylw='\e[43m' # Yellow bakblu='\e[44m' # Blue bakpur='\e[45m' # Purple bakcyn='\e[46m' # Cyan bakwht='\e[47m' # White txtrst='\e[0m' # Text Reset
When configuring a Samba server, remember that the discovery of machines on the network happens not only with DNS but also with a few other mechanisms too. I recently setup a number of virtual machines for developers, that were created by cloning a single instance. Mistakenly, I thought that adding a DNS config entry for each virtual machine on the host's /etc/hosts would be enough, but it's not. What we found was that everyone was connecting to the same VM (another requirement was that they be on the same subnet).